Monday, June 21, 2010

Calling all Skirtmakers

I'm finally writing the tutorial for the mock patchwork skirt. Why is the fabric for the tutorial skirt different than the featured skirt? Why, indeed. The answer is all wrapped up in the backwards way I put together patterns. I don't sketch an idea, make a mock-up, take careful measurements, and then make the final product. No, I put stuff together, rip seams apart, curse under my breath(or not), and then write a pattern. Doesn't the first method sound so much more civilized? Of course it does. Will I ever work that way? I wouldn't know how. That's why the skirt in the tutorial is made out of a different fabric. The process for both is the same minus the cursing.

Anyway, here's the tutorial:

Simple Drawstring Skirt

Materials:

At least 1 yard of fabric
(this varies based on your measurements, but I used 1 yard for the skirt and drawstring)
Large piece of paper
(I used a 24" x 36" piece of newsprint. I buy these in pads from the Art supply store)
Quilters Clear, Acrylic Ruler
Measuring Tape
Pencil
Paper scissors
Fabric Marking Pen
Machine Sewing Thread
Coordinated Top Stitching Machine Thread
Iron
Pins
Tape Measure
Safety Pin
Rotary Cutter and Self-healing Mat
Small Scrap of Fusible Interfacing
Seam Ripper

Measuring for the Pattern:

Little side note: I made my skirt so that it had very little ease and sat about 2" below my waist.

1. Measure around your the upper part of your hips, about 2" below your natural waist.
2. Add 3/4"" for ease and seam allowance.
3. Divide this measurement by 4.
4. Measure around your actual hips.
5. Add 3/4" for ease and seam allowance.
6. Divide this number by 4.
7. Measure the vertical distance between the upper part of your hips and and your hips.
8. Determine how long you want your skirt to be.
(mine was 16")
9. Add 2" to that measurement.

Drafting the Pattern:
1. Working along one of the paper straight edges, draw a point perpendicular to the edge that is the same distance as your divided upper hip measurement.
3. Using a ruler, draw a line perpendicular to the paper's edge to that point.
4. Measure down from the line the distance between your upper hips and hips and mark it with a dot.
5. Draw a line perpendicular to the edge of the paper so that it intersects the dot. This second line should be the same as your divided hip measurements.
6. From your upper hip line, measure your desired skirt length. Mark with a dot.
7. Draw a line perpendicular to the straight edge of the paper that intersects this line and is about 1 1/2" longer than the upper hip line.
8. Draw a line to connect the endpoints of the upper hip line and the bottom line.
9. Using Paper scissors, cut out your pattern.
Note: The straight edge of the paper is now the edge of the pattern to be positioned on the fold of the fabric.

Cutting the Fabric:

1. Fold fabric in half and pin skirt pattern to fabric so that straight edge of pattern aligns with fold in fabric.
2. Using a rotary cutter, cut around pattern.
3. Remove pins and reposition pattern to cut a second piece like the first.
4. From same fabric, cut enough 1 1/2" strips to make a length measuring about 48".

Sewing the Skirt:

Note: Unless otherwise noted, all seam allowances are 3/8".


1. With right side facing, fold skirt in half.
2. Use your finger to crease the midpoint of the skirt along the upper edge and lay skirt on a flat surface.



3. Center a 1" line about 1 1/2" from raw edge of fabric. Mark with a fabric marker.
4. Cut a small square of fusible interfacing and, following manufacturer's instruction, adhere to wrong side of skirt directly behind marked line.
Note: This will give the drawstring opening a little security.
5. Using a buttonhole foot and coordinating thread, sew a buttonhole along marked line.



6. Gently open buttonhole with seam ripper.
Note: Skirt piece with buttonhole opening will now be referred to as skirt front.

7. Pin skirt front to skirt back, right sides together, along side seams.
8. Sew together side seams. Press seams open.



9.Serge or zig-zag stitch seams to finish.



10. Top stitch along both sides of seams on right side of skirt.



11. Working with top of skirt, press in a 1/4" seam allowance.
12. Press an additional 1" seam allowance.



Note: This forms the casing for the drawstring.
13. Sew casing in place close to folded edge.
14. Using diagonal seams, sew 1 1/2" strips together to form a single length.Press seams open.
15. Working on an ironing board with wrong side of drawstring length facing up, press short sides of drawstring length 1/4".



16. Meet long sides of drawstring together and press.



17. Open out to reveal midpoint crease.



18. Working with one long edge at a time, fold and press long edges toward midpoint crease.



19. Meet long folded edges together and press.
20. Top stitch drawstring.



21. Attach a safety pin to one end of drawstring and thread through casing.



22. Hem skirt.
23. Wear with pride. Maybe even with a newly knit top.



Just a suggestion. Enjoy!

8 comments:

GroovyMoonChild said...

The grey sweater looks even better than the green one. Good job!

K said...

So Malka - I'm not a skirt maker. I gave up clothes a very long time ago. But I like your writing. So I liked the piece. Thank you.

Rachel said...

Thank you so much for the tutorial, it looks like something even I could make!! :) Would you be able to maybe do a similarly easy tute for a skirt with a little more flounce?

Cheers!
Rachel

stephie @ narrativeself said...

Love your description of your process - I find it so much easier to just 'do it' as well, I think it's probably got something to do with a kinesthetic learning style!!! And the good thing is, you've now got two new skirts :)

KarenB said...

Geez, you are a creative machine! The skirt is adorable and with a beautiful sweater to boot! Fabulous!

Ashley said...

The skirt is adorable, but I really love that gray top!

Lisa said...

Like it! I'm a little pattern-shy, but I may try this one.

Organizing Mommy said...

That's great. I am laughing about all of the sweater comments. I worked so hard on a sweater and had my daughter throw together a necklace--took her about 4 minutes. Everyone oohed and aahed over the necklace instead of the sweater. LOL.